Posts Tagged good memories

Change your thoughts; change your life

Attitude and behaviors are two things that can determine success or failure, both are influenced by memories.    

 

According to Dr Norman Doidge, “The discovery of neuroplasticity, that our thoughts can change the structure and function of our brains, even into old age, is the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years.”

According to Dr Norman Doidge, “The discovery of neuroplasticity, that our thoughts can change the structure and function of our brains, even into old age, is the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years.”

We’re going to be hearing a lot more about rewiring your brain in the near future. Research done by neuroscientist has yielded some very interesting findings. According to a recent article in New Yorker magazine, attitude and behaviors are two things that make you successful in whatever you set out to do. It turns out attitude and behaviors are formed by your memories, both good and bad.

In a similar article on the INC.com website, your memory is not like to video playback which is most commonly presumed, but more like a video editing process. We have the ability to diminish bad memories by changing details if we remember them to be small and insignificant. For good memories we do the same thing in reverse; exaggerate good memories by focusing on the good outcomes from that incident.

Harvard University researchers conducted studies at Massachusetts General Hospital to see what effect meditation had on the brain. Results from using magnet-imaging have shown individuals who mediated for an eight-week period dramatically strengthen the brain structures associated with self-awareness, compassion, and introspection. This supports the theory that you can modify your brain.

The term “thoughts are things” may have more credence that just an old adage. Negative and positive thoughts and memories directly affect how we perceive our world and how we react to situations but they are not equal. Unfortunately the negative is three times stronger that the positive. This is called the negative bias. As a result of a survival instinct left over from our hunter gatherer days, we are wired to focus more on the negative. But in our modern-day world, the negative can hold us back and limit us from achieving real success and potential.

 

The brain produces electrical signals, which, together with chemical reactions, let the parts of the body communicate. Nerves send these signals throughout the body.

The brain produces electrical signals, which, together with chemical reactions, let the parts of the body communicate. Nerves send these signals throughout the body.

Selective memory and just recalling good memories is not going to help remedy the situation, it is important to get to the source and modify the bad memories so they will have less of an impact. When you recall these bad memories, imagine them smaller and change the details of the incident so that memory no longer gives you bad feelings. If you learned or gained something from a bad experience focus on what you took away and not how bad the incident was. When we recall good memories relive them attentively by paying attention to every detail. Go to that place in your mind during that incident by recalling the great feelings you felt during that time. Nothing worth having is easy to come by. This is going to involve some effort to change your thinking so don’t get discouraged and keep trying.

Can you climb a mountain? What was your first thought after reading this question? Was it a list of reasons why you can’t climb a mountain? If so, you really need to change your thinking about yourself and your abilities. Now if I repeated that same question instead of thinking why you can’t, try thinking about how you can. And also try removing these two words from your vocabulary; “should have”.

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